Are you the kind of RV traveler who enjoys stopping along the way to visit farmers markets, fruit stands and other local agribusiness attractions? If you are, Georgia Grown Trail 301, a 150-mile journey to discover Georgia’s farming heritage, is a trip you’ll want to make soon.

An added bonus on this scenic route is that you’ll discover historic sites you might not find in the guide books, places that speak of local color and flavor and Georgia’s Civil War history. Interested? Then follow along as we make a quick trip along the highlights of Georgia Grown Trail 301.

You can start your journey in the town of Sylvania, GA, in the state’s Magnolia Midlands region.  A stop at the Georgia Visitors Center on Highway 301, your route for the entire journey, will supply more information about battlefields, historic structures and the farms and vineyards that bring thousands of agritourists to Screven County each year. Save time to stroll through downtown Sylvania to absorb the town’s serene beauty.

As you make your way south along the Georgia Grown Trail 301 toward Statesboro, you’ll notice vineyards and farms in abundance, so slow down and enjoy local farm stands and gorgeous scenery. If you like planning your campsites in advance, check the campgrounds in Brunswick, a coastal gem just east of your route, as well Magnolia Springs State Park west of Sylvania and private RV resorts in towns like Guyton and Folkston.

While enjoying the college town energy of Statesboro, be sure to save time for a side trip to Hunter Cattle Company, twenty minutes east near the town of Brooklet. You’ll find a vibrant family farm dedicated to sustainable, pastured beef, pork and poultry, with a farm store, tours and plenty of Southern charm.

Another Georgia Grown Statesboro favorite is Braswell Food Company, where nationally-famous preserves and condiments have been made and sold since the 1940s. The factory store is open Monday through Friday, so don’t miss the chance to experience their creative collection of products.

If you happen to be in Statesboro on Saturday morning, make your way to the Statesboro Main Street Farmers Market. Besides plenty of local produce, you’ll be able to purchase products like grits, cornmeal and whole wheat flour from nearby Freeman’s Mill.

One more stop well worth your time as you’re leaving Statesboro is Meinhardt Vineyards, east of Hwy 301 on GA-46. Their fabulous Muscadine varieties can be sampled and purchased while you’re there, and the vineyard is a picture perfect place to spend an hour or two.

If you’re a fan of both RV travel and scrumptious, freshly-baked fruitcake, you’re going to want to make a stop in Claxton, GA, just down Hwy 301 from Statesboro. Two local companies deliver their fruit-filled goodness to visitors in this little town. Claxton Fruit Cake has been a holiday staple in American homes since 1910, and Georgia Fruit Cake Co. offers not only the town’s signature pastry but also gourmet coffees and other fine foods from a quaint corner storefront.

Traveling south through Tattnall County on Hwy 301, you’ll begin to see evidence that the county grows more Vidalia Sweet Onions than any other place in Georgia. Along with this world-famous delicacy, the town of Glennville and surrounding area offers agritourist RV travelers an amazing number of ways to explore local flavor.

Watermelon Creek Vineyards is just such a place, offering tastings of wines made from Georgia Grown muscadine grapes and other tempting treats. Another Glennville favorite of RV travelers is a stop at DC Durrence Farm, north of town on Hwy 301. This family farm offers u-pick vegetables or a farm stand where picked vegetables are available for sale.

If you’ve got a fishing fan on-board your RV, you’re going to want to make a reservation to tour Armstrong Cricket Farm while in Glennville. Selling brown crickets and bait worms all over the country has made this locally-owned concern famous with anglers.

Where else can you find natural goodness on the Georgia Grown 301 Trail near Glennville? Check out Folsom Farms Country Store for dressings, pickles and, of course,

Gordonia Alatamaha State Park

Gordonia Alatamaha State Park

fresh Vidalia Sweet Onions. By the way, if you plan to stay a day or two in the Glennville area, check out the RV campsites at Gordonia-Alatamaha State Park.  It’s an easy drive and a pleasant place to set up camp.

We’ve got a trio of burgs to explore on the road toward Folkston that you won’t want to miss. Morgan Lake between Jesup and Ludowici is a fisherman’s paradise, as well as home to a nice, family-owned RV campground. The countryside surrounding Jesup is filled with outdoor recreation venues on the Altamaha River, as well as side trips to spots like Poppell Farms, Growing Green Plant Nursery & Farm in Screven and the Jesup Train Depot, built in 1903 and still operating as an Amtrak station.

And that brings us to the end of the Trail, in Folkston. Tucked between the St Mary’s River and Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Folkston is a place where you’re going to want to spend a lot of time outdoors. Explore the swamp, paddle the river and camp in lush, green places where birds and wildlife abound. Don’t leave Folkston without experiencing the Folkston Funnel Viewing Platform for a one-of-a-kind opportunity to watch more than sixty trains pass through each day.

There are dozens of fascinating places to explore as you make your way by RV along the Georgia Grown Trail 301. Plot your itinerary today and get started; we’re here to help with an RV rental and can’t wait to hear about your adventures.

You may have passed through Salt Lake City on your way to California camping or a Rocky Mountain vacation, but did you know that there are dozens of places to play within a few hours’ drive of Utah’s largest city? From mountain-studded national forests to the starkly beautiful national parks of southern Utah, it’s all easy to access when you start in Salt Lake City.

You probably already know that the city is bordered on the east by the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, stretching two million acres, from northern Utah into Idaho and Wyoming. Plenty of national forest RV camping is available in the Wasatch National Forest closest to our starting point, so pick a place to explore and get started.

Another beautiful spot for RV adventures near Salt Lake City is just an hour southeast, at Wasatch Mountain State Park. With a nice mixture of modern campground amenities and outdoor recreation possibilities, this is a prime spot for RV campers new to the Salt Lake City area.

While camping at Wasatch Mountain State Park, you’ll have the chance to play a round on one of the state park’s four golf courses, enjoy scenic drives and hiking trails and visit historic sites, all within the park’s boundaries. You can reach this outdoor wonderland by following I-80 E from Salt Lake City to the junction with US-189 and then south forty miles to the park entrance.

When you’re ready to venture farther south of the city for national park RV camping, you’re in for a treat. Within a five hour drive south of Salt Lake City are a half dozen national parks, each with its own special appeal. From the green and crimson canyons of Zion National Park to the hundreds of natural stone arches in Arches National Park, campers will find unforgettable landscapes in every direction. Here’s a list of the national parks south of Salt Lake City that you’ll want to add to your camping vacation itinerary.

  • Arches National Park – near Moab, UT, with more than one hundred square miles of red rock arches to discover by scenic drive, hiking or canyoneering.
  • Zion National Park – four and a half hours south of Salt Lake City via I-
    Zion National Park

    Zion National Park

    15, waits to amaze RV travelers with the sight of enormous sandstone cliffs turned shades of pink and red by time.

  • Bryce Canyon National Park – tucked between I-15 and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, promises memorable views and once-in-a-lifetime hiking through gigantic sandstone ‘hoodoos’ and spires.
  • Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument – just east of Bryce Canyon, is a vacation in itself, an area the size of a small state filled with slot canyons, plateaus swooping upward from the desert floor and wilderness areas filled with hidden waterfalls and streams.
  • Capitol Reef National Park – north of Grand Staircase, is a completely different experience for RV campers Visit the Fruita Historic District to learn about Southern Utah’s early settlers and then plan time to hike or take a scenic drive to see the multi-colored canyons formed by this giant ‘fold’.
  • Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Lake Powell – in far southern Utah, has outdoor recreation opportunities for everyone. Scenic drives, trails and the blue, blue water of Lake Powell will lead you to red rock canyons, historic sites and impossibly tall rock formations. Don’t forget to make the trip to Glen Canyon Dam; the tour is worth the drive! 

Southern Utah travel tip: RV travelers to southern Utah may find it easier to make reservations at private RV campgrounds that surround these national parks, as the campsites within most parks fill early. Fortunately, quality RV parks abound in Southern Utah, so just remember to make reservations before you come. 

Didn’t we say there’s a lot to see and do when you begin your RV camping adventures in Salt Lake City? Pick one or two or stretch out RV camping season and see them all. The state and national parks spread across the Beehive State are sure to become a part of your favorite RV travel memories.

From rock-ledged, old growth forests to an amazing collection of underground caverns, the Commonwealth of Kentucky has attractions to build your RV camping season around. Why not use our list of six Kentucky RV campgrounds worth discovering to start planning this year’s adventures?

  1. Zilpo Campground, Cave Run Lake

On an eight-thousand-acre lake surrounded by Daniel Boone National Forest in northeastern Kentucky, this campground ranks high with family campers. Hiking trails through rocky forest land and trips to historic sites like a nineteenth century iron smelting furnace and the last fire tower remaining in the national forest keep things interesting. It’s also an excellent place to fish, with two modern marinas and lively populations of muskie and largemouth bass.

Campground Details: electric hookups, centrally located drinking water and dump station, showers and flush toilets, swimming beach, camp store.

  1. Pleasant Ridge Campground, Yatesville Lake State Park
Yatesville Lake State Park, Kentucky

Yatesville Lake State Park, Kentucky

This classic Kentucky state park combines golfing, fishing, boating and RV camping in the lush scenery of the Eastern Kentucky foothills. Pleasant Ridge Campground is small enough to offer an intimate camping experience while still offering easy access to the marina, hiking trails and golf course.

Campground Details: lakeside campsites, full hook-ups, showers, laundry room, playground, dump station.

  1. The Narrows Campground, Barren River Lake

About two hours south of Louisville near Bowling Green, ten-thousand-acre Barren River Lake is well worth discovering by RV. The Narrows Campground is perfect for RVers bringing the boat along, thanks to its proximity to one of the lake’s marinas. Anglers will want to explore the many creeks feeding into this lake for the chance to catch bass, crappie and channel cats. The campground is also adjacent to Lindsey Nature Trail, so plan time to go wildlife watching in the woods.

Campground Details: water and electric sites, boat launch, dump station, showers and restrooms, playground, swimming area. 

  1. Dog Creek Campground, Nolin River Lake

Right next door to Mammoth Cave National Park in southcentral Kentucky, Nolin River Lake is a favored destination for paddlers and fishermen. Set up camp at Dog Creek Campground, a comfortable spot well-situated for putting a canoe or kayak in the water. You’ll also find boat launches nearby if you’re going out in a larger boat in search of walleye or crappie. The Green River ferry into the national park is close by, so don’t miss the chance to do a little cave exploring while you’re camped here.

Campground Details: electric hookups, drinking water available, showers & restrooms, dump station, pull-thru sites, playground, swimming beach, boat ramp.

  1. Kincaid Lake State Park Campground

Looking for a place where you can rent a boat and troll your way around a small lake with the kids? Kincaid Lake State Park in northeastern Kentucky offers camping families a wooded campground, small no-wake fishing lake, mini-golf, a 9-hole golf course and access to hiking trails. The full-service marina makes it easy to buy fishing supplies, rent small watercraft and get out on the water as soon as you get there.

Campground Details: electric & water sites, dump station, showers and restrooms, playground, camp store, marina.

  1. Carter Caves State Resort Park Campground

There’s no more fascinating way to keep cool in the heat of summer than with a subterranean tour of one of Kentucky’s many caves. Carter Caves State Resort Park’s campground allows you to camp in comfort near the entrances to two of this cavern-rich area’s most famous caves. Take the cave tours and explore the rugged beauty of the area on the park’s many trails. The kids will enjoy the campground’s pool and planned activities throughout the summer.

Campground Details: water & electric pull-thru sites, dump station, bathhouse, playground, mini golf, swimming pool.

We hope this list gets your Kentucky RV camping vacation off to a good start. As always, we’re here to help, with a Louisville RV rental closest to these campgrounds!

Photo attribution:  By U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntington District – http://www.lrh.usace.army.mil/projects/lakes/ybc/, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10896597

by: Bree Weidman

If you’re planning an RV-style road trip across the United States, you’ve probably got one thing on your mind- adventure! From the endless deserts and painted skies of the “Wild West” to the coastal plains and rolling seas of the Eastern Seaboard, the U.S. has plenty to offer international visitors.

To help you prepare for your trip, we’ve taken into account both U.S. culture and the rules of the road to devise these 10 health and safety tips:

  1. Don’t advertise yourself as a tourist

When you look like you don’t know where you’re going (or if it’s clear you’re “not from around here”), thieves are more likely to view you as an easy target. Keep the road maps in your car out of plain sight, recommends RoadTripAmerica, and “if your vehicle is laden with luggage, park where you can see it from a restaurant or store.”

Don’t want to dress like a tourist? Learn all about American clothing and style with this free guide.

  1. Make frequent stops

Every few hours, pull over and take a break- even if you don’t think you’re sleepy. Use this time to stretch your legs, revel in the fresh air, and get some nourishment. But don’t park on the shoulder or in the breakdown lane unless you have an emergency, says Independent Traveler.

If you’re traveling in a group, rotating drivers will allow you to nap without wasting valuable time. And if you’re traveling solo, the site recommends listening to music, cracking your window, and refraining from using speed control, since concentrating can help keep you awake. If you’re too tired to drive, certainly pull over for a nap!

  1. Understand distracted-driving laws

Hopefully you already know not to drink and drive (and to always wear your seatbelt). But did you know that using a hand-held cell phone while driving is against primary enforcement law in 14 U.S. states? This means you can be cited even without committing an additional traffic offense.

The U.S. has primary enforcement laws regarding the use of seatbelts, too. For additional info on seatbelt laws, DUI laws, and more, check out this Guide to U.S. Culture and Customs. 

  1. Have an emergency plan in place before severe weather hits

Upon arriving in a new location, take time to devise an emergency plan, suggest Jason and Kristin Snow of Snowmads.com. Be sure to find the nearest storm shelter and evacuation spots- especially in areas prone to floods, hurricanes, or tornadoes.

The “snowmads” also recommend that you react quickly to severe weather threats, value your life (and the lives of law enforcement) above the welfare of your possessions, and gather “the most up-to-date weather data available.”

  1. Prepare your vehicle for long-distance travel

Like cars, RV’s need to be properly serviced and maintained. According to Camping World, oil and filters should be changed at regular intervals, roof seals and seams should be inspected every 6 months, and tire pressure and lug nuts should be inspected before every trip. Before jetting off on your vacation, check with your RV rental company to see what your responsibilities are.

  1. Pack an emergency kit

No traveler really wants to consider the possibility of becoming stranded on the side of the road, but emergencies happen- especially on long-term trips. Having these 6 things in your emergency kit can save you a world of trouble.

  1. Invest in physical maps – and a guidebook

While it’s a good idea to load your smartphone with travel apps (Google Maps, GasBuddy, and iExit will all come in handy), there’s still a chance you’ll run into spotty cell service in the U.S. For those times you can’t get a signal, a fold-out atlas is ideal.

A Dangerous Business travel blog recommends a Rand McNally road atlas and a book like The Next Exit, a complete guide to interstate highway amenities.

  1. Get international travel health insurance

Did you know that a broken leg can cost up to $7,500 to fix in the United States? Before departing your home country, it’s your responsibility as an international traveler to find out whether your standard medical insurance policy covers you outside your home country.

If it doesn’t (and many do not), an international travel medical plan can provide coverage for eligible expenses resulting from unexpected illness or injury. Not only do these plans provide financial protection and access to quality medical care, but some plans include benefits like Medical Evacuation, Natural Disaster, and Personal Liability.

  1. Read up on social etiquette

There’s more to feeling safe and secure on a road trip than simply avoiding injury. In addition to prepping your vehicle for travel, following traffic laws, and acquiring insurance, be sure to read up on social etiquette in the U.S. By understanding behavioral norms, you can bypass uncomfortable (or, in worst-case scenarios, threatening) situations.

This Guide to U.S. Culture and Customs has everything you need to know- from general manners, acceptable gestures, and welcome topics of conversation to dining etiquette and tipping guidelines!

  1. Keep your valuables safe

Get in the habit of locking your RV each time you head out, no matter how safe a campground appears. Lock valuables in either the glove compartment or trunk before you reach your destination, suggests Independent Traveler. If possible, luggage should be stored in the trunk.

Kampgrounds of America recommends also keeping your shades closed and purchasing devices to protect your vehicle while you’re gone, like a safe, trailer-hitch lock, or motion detector.

If you thought these tips were helpful, find these and many more in this free, downloadable Guide to U.S. Culture and Customs! Following these tips and tricks will result in a seamless cultural transition- no matter where you choose to stop along the way. 

Bree Weidman is a Marketing Specialist for Tokio Marine HCC – MIS Group, a full-service insurance organization offering domestic short term and travel medical insurance products to international travelers worldwide.  Though she’s been writing her entire life, Bree has been a contributing author of the MIS Group blog for about a year now, covering topics paramount to global adventurers: health, safety, culture, and insurance, to name a few. When Bree isn’t writing, you’ll likely find her daydreaming about her next international vacation!

Three New Mexico Fishing Hot Spots for RV Travelers

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Planning your RV camping and fishing road trip and planning to pass through New Mexico? Slow down your roll and make sure you experience the fishing possibilities in the Land of Enchantment. With fly fishing season beginning in June and …

 

Nine State Park Campgrounds to Kickstart RV Camping Season

What plans have you made for camping on Memorial Day Weekend and beyond? With the beauty of America’s state parks just waiting to be enjoyed, there’s no time like the present to find your favorites in the comfort of a …

 

From Wilkes-Barre, PA to Adventure: Four Summer RV Road Trips

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Wilkes-Barre, PA has plenty to offer vacationers, but what if you’d like to leave the city behind? Four RV road trips within easy driving distance from Wilkes-Barre offer a whole summer of vacation fun. Here’s what you need to know …

 

Adventure RV Camping at Great Sand Dunes National Park

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If you’re new to RV camping and aren’t sure it can fit into your active, adventure-seeking lifestyle, you’re in for a surprise. Coming back to RV comfort after a long day spent climbing, canyoneering, trail running or whatever it is …

 

RV Camping with Kids—Five Reasons It’s a Win

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If you’ve shied away from RV camping with the kids, this is a great time to take a second look. Getting your youngsters away from home, in an outdoor space that’s extraordinary, can be a winning formula for families. From …

 

Five Reasons Why Electric Bikes Are Amazing for RVers

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It’s no secret that RVers are adventurous folks, always looking for a great new way to explore our country, see its many beautiful sights, and come up with fun and innovative ways to travel. What some RV fans might not …